• Students in performance in 1600s outfits
  • Costume student giving presentation in front of her work
  • Group of actors in performance in costumes made from various materials and textures.
  • Costume student fitting a dress with actor backstage
  • Costume student pins yellow dress on manikin

BFA (Costume)

CRICOS CODE 083698G

Applications to study at NIDA in 2020 are now closed.

Express interest for 2021

Contact NIDA

About the course

This course trains students in every aspect of the techniques – traditional, digital, research and management – for the creation and construction of costumes. In addition to honing their techniques in the workshop, students apply their learning throughout the course by working in roles of increasing seniority on different productions and projects.

Students learn all the techniques and tools of a costume professional, including costume construction, tailoring, pattern making, period cutting, draping, costume management, art finishing, fabric dyeing, millinery, shoe making, corsetry, stretchwear and leatherwork, as well as budget management and how to supervise a costume department.

As the course progresses, students apply their skills in increasingly complex situations through practical workshops, exhibitions, installations, short film, theatre and research projects.

From their very first semester, students will play key roles in the Seasons of Student Productions, collaborating with actors, set and costume designers as costume assistants, dressers, costume makers and art finishers. By third year, students will supervise their own team as costume supervisors.

The tutors for this course are some of the most experienced specialists in the industry, and all students spend at least 320 hours on industry placements across theatre, film, TV and/or entertainment, providing further opportunity for students to forge creative networks and graduate feeling confident, employable and well-connected.

Course dates and times

Course duration and contact hours

Students are at NIDA from 9am to 6pm from Monday to Friday. During production terms students may also be required for rehearsals after hours and on weekends.

Additional time also needs to be allocated to library work, research, preparation for classes and private study. For this reason it is difficult for NIDA students to maintain regular part-time jobs. Studying at NIDA is a big commitment so students need to manage their time and resources carefully. 

All NIDA Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees are three-year full-time courses. All NIDA Master of Fine Arts courses, except for Cultural Leadership, are 15-month full-time courses. 

2019 course dates

SEMESTER 1

Term 1: 4 February- 14 April

Mid-Semester Break: 15 April– 28 April

Term 2: 29 April– 30 June

MID-YEAR BREAK: 1 July - 21 July

SEMESTER 2

Term 3: 22 July– 8 September

Mid-Semester Break: 9 September- 15 September

Term 4: 16 September– 17 November

The semester continues until early December for those involved in the Directors’ productions.

The scheduling and delivery of this course each year is subject to minimum enrolment numbers.

2020 course dates

SEMESTER 1

Term 1: 3 February- 9 April

Mid-Semester Break: 10 April– 26 April

Term 2: 27 April– 28 June

MID-YEAR BREAK: 29 June - 19 July

SEMESTER 2

Term 3: 20 July– 6 September

Mid-Semester Break: 7 September- 13 September

Term 4: 14 September– 15 November

The semester continues until early December for those involved in the Directors’ productions.

The scheduling and delivery of this course each year is subject to minimum enrolment numbers.

Subjects

First year

Costume Studio

SEMESTER ONE

COS7101A COSTUME STUDIO (30 credit points)

This subject introduces students to the skills and knowledge required to produce creative works integral to becoming a costume professional. The learning in this subject forms a foundation that is built upon throughout the course. In order to achieve this students undertake experimentation by dissecting and re-creating female costumes through a study of flat pattern making and construction (both contemporary and period) and draping and moulding on the form. The classes utilise a range of methodologies that may be used to satisfy a broad spectrum of performance genres and industry scenarios.

Initial studies are undertaken in the performance characteristics, classification and application of materials that are fundamental to the creation of costume. Students are introduced to research, evaluations and interpretation of information with a view to raising the students’ awareness of the importance of contextualising their work and analysing it within a creative environment.

SEMESTER TWO

COS7101B COSTUME STUDIO (30 credit points)

COS7101B Costume Studio builds upon the learning introduced in the preceding semester but also introduces new areas of exploration. Empirical studies continue in the areas of millinery, flat pattern making and construction, draping and moulding on the form. Within these areas students are now encouraged to begin to form judgments regarding line, form and silhouette. Tailoring techniques are introduced as part of an introduction to an understanding of costuming the male form. Costume Studio COS7101B is designed to contextualise the costume realisation aspects of the course, the study of costume history is introduced and informs all costume learning from this point. It introduces students to the movements and trends in western clothing that inform costume. Studies revolve around the social paradigms and contexts reflected in clothing up to the beginning of the 19th century.

Costume Interdisciplinary Collaboration

SEMESTER ONE

COS7102A COSTUME INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (15 credit points)

In this subject students begin to apply skills learnt in Costume Studio to mount a theatre production framed within professional conditions. Being part of an interdisciplinary team enables them to gain an holistic view of their own roles and responsibilities and those of others within the production process. For the first time students become cognisant of the need to use appropriate communication methods and terminology pertinent to the different stages of the development of a production. As a junior member of a costume team guided by a senior costume student supervisor, they gain empirical experience of the process of realising stage costumes designed by a student designer.
As one of the integral interdisciplinary relationships for the costumier is with the performer, the production process enables the Costume student to learn through an immersive experience backstage encompassing dressing-room etiquette and industry protocol. The students’ Studio work is further contextualised by the realisation of one complete basic female costume component and a millinery work supervised by specialist class tutors.

SEMESTER TWO

COS7102B COSTUME INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (15 credit points)

Students join with an interdisciplinary team from within NIDA to stage / mount a new production selected to expand and complement their earlier collaborative experience. Through the choice of a changed work environment the students are able to comprehend the differences resulting from a new venue, production and personnel.
Expanding the experience of production and backstage etiquette, protocols and communication strategies enables the students to identify issues and problems as they arise and contribute at a more in-depth level to the overall production. The developing experience and knowledge founded on their COS7102A Costume Interdisciplinary Collaboration involvement enhances the ability of the student to communicate with the designer, who is their most significant collaborator.
Although students contribute to the costuming of all performers within their assigned production, it is a male performer who is the focus of the making of a completed costume. The tailoring techniques that have been introduced in Studio are utilised for the first time in an holistic manner to tailor a basic garment for a male performer.

Performance and Ideas

SEMESTER ONE 

COM7101A Performance and Ideas (10 credit points)

Subject Purpose
In Semester One of the first year ‘Performance and Ideas’ gives students a theoretical, critical and experiential understanding of key contexts, forms and conventions based on a chronological framework that supports an understanding of the Western theatrical canon. The subject supports student’s abilities to actively relate various historic practices of the Western theatrical canon to their own performance-based disciplines as 21st century artists.

Content
Throughout this subject students will:
Examine a range of historical movements and practitioners in the Western theatrical canon, identifying specific forms, conventions and practices
Develop an understanding of industry practices across a range of performance disciplines relating to various conventions and forms within the canon
Interpret and engage with artistic ideas in both practical and conceptual realisation from the perspective of their specific performance discipline
Explore and reflect on how aspects of a theatrical form and context inform practices in related disciplines.

SEMESTER TWO - COM7101B PERFORMANCE AND IDEAS (10 credit points)

COM7101B Performance and Ideas investigates different performance texts to create an understanding of the development of modernity from the 19th to the 20th century. The course looks at different art forms and looks at movements and ideas that structure contemporary performance practice. We also will make the “now” present through postmodern and contemporary readings and recent productions, specifically focusing on students’ own practice.

COM7101B Performance and Ideas asks three main questions:
* What is modernity?
* What is the drive towards truth or realistic illusion?
* In what ways does this tradition influence our meaning making and our
practice today?

Introduction to Collaboration

SEMESTER ONE

COM7102A Introduction to Collaboration (5 credit points)

Subject Purpose
The subject introduces the students to the principles of collaboration, which includes defining collaboration and creativity and examining how ethics, values and behaviours of collaboration are generated. Students investigate notions of ownership, agreement, creative conflict and how to generate ideas and create innovative practice. These investigations provide a foundation for creative collaborative projects undertaken in second year and beyond.

Content
Throughout this learning period students will
* Investigate various theories and practices for creative collaboration in the cultural sector
* Apply collaborative practices to the development of new and interdisciplinary work
* Work empathetically, to a shared vision
* Apply discipline expertise to a collaborative project
* Evaluate and reflect on process and performance

SEMESTER TWO

COM7102B Introduction to Collaboration (5 credit points)

COM7102B Introduction to Collaboration builds upon the principles of collaboration, skills and conceptual tasks featured in COM7102A Introduction to Collaboration. In this subject those preparatory tasks are now realised through practice in a Group Collaborative Project.

Second year

Costume Studio

SEMESTER ONE

COS7201A COSTUME STUDIO (30 credit points)

In Costume Studio 2A students create costumes through a series of projects at a more complex and autonomous level, managing both their own time and project budgets. These scenario-related, problem-solving activities involve the students making decisions by synthesising knowledge and assuming responsibility for their own creative decisions. Students begin to integrate their prior studies and evaluate the appropriateness of skills and techniques to each scenario.
Studies in costume history continue to inform the recreation and interpretation of the students’ work and this is reflected in their assessment tasks that involve evaluating the period work of other creators. The study focuses on 19th and 20th century clothing and includes the examination of original garments and an investigation of the social and psychological elements that moulded what societies wore and how they wore it.
With an increased depth within the study of costume it now becomes necessary to examine the influence of underpinnings on the human form and integrate this understanding into three dimensional experimentation. Students now research and create underpinnings relevant to their project makes and, through a series of tutorial fittings, are encouraged to evaluate the body modifications that they have achieved.

SEMESTER TWO

COS7201B COSTUME STUDIO (30 credit points)

COS7201B Costume Studio expands on the contexts for costume from various forms of live performance previously done to look at the implications of costume for screen and use this knowledge to distinguish between the various applications of costume in film and television. The format of projects in COS7201A Costume Studio continues in this subject with new scenarios for the research and realisation of costumes. These scenarios are chosen so that by the end of their second year Costume students have experienced a broad range of theatrical forms and, through the choice of periods and interpretations, have covered major making challenges and techniques. A series of seminars take place introduced by screen professionals in a range of roles during which case studies are examined and related to the students’ accumulated knowledge. Resources and budget organisation now progress into a more holistic study of costume management. The content of this study informs and influences the experiential learning in COS7202B Costume Interdisciplinary Collaboration which culminates at the end of the semester with the students supervising a production

Costume Interdisciplinary Collaboration

SEMESTER ONE

COS7202A COSTUME INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (15 credit points)

In making a fully tailored and more advanced male garment for performance, students expand the depth of their collaboration with the designer and performer. Students consult with designers on details of the design and performance requirements of the costume. They discuss and advise the design students as to the appropriate fabrics and construction techniques to be used to make the costume.
With input from the designer, performer and stage management, students problem-solve issues that arise from the making and rehearsal process. They begin to form independent judgements on scale, proportion, line and detail for the male form in performance.
New and non-traditional materials and techniques are harnessed for use in a project responding to issues of scale and visual impact when making for sizeable venues that differ from the NIDA experience. Experts in fields of the arts external to NIDA, are brought in to augment the students’ understanding of the possibilities of collaboration within the wider arts environment.

SEMESTER TWO

COS7202B COSTUME INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (15 credit points)

In making a more complex female garment for performance, students expand the depth of their collaboration with the designer and performer. Students consult with designers on details of the design and performance requirements of the costume including the desired effect to be achieved by underpinnings. They discuss and advise the design students as to the appropriate fabrics and construction techniques to be used in the making of the costume. With input from the designer, performer and stage management, student’s problem-solve issues that arise from the making and rehearsal process. They begin to form independent judgements on scale, proportion, line and detail for the female form in performance. For the first time Costume students have the sole responsibility to translate a designer’s concept into a complete set of costumes for a production. Following theoretical classes and industry case-studies in COS7102B Costume Studio, students’ progress to comprehending more clearly the complexity and responsibilities involved in working with directors, performers, designers, production and stage managers at a management level.

Performance and Ideas

SEMESTER ONE

COM7201A Performance and Ideas (10 credit points)

Subject Purpose
Semester One of the second year of ‘Performance and Ideas’ builds on students’ theoretical, critical and experiential understandings of key contexts, forms and conventions of the Western theatrical canon and the various social, intercultural and political influences that shaped it in the mid to late 20th and early 21st century.
Building on COM7101A & COM7101B, it supports students’ ability to actively relate these various historic practices to their own performance-based disciplines as 21st century artists.

Content
Throughout this subject students will:
Synthesise their understanding of the relationship, correspondence and variance of different forms of theatrical and screen storytelling
Develop an understanding of industry practices across a range of performance disciplines relating to various conventions and forms of the 20th and 21st centuries
Interpret and engage with artistic ideas in both practical and conceptual realisation from the perspective of their specific performance discipline
Examine a range of ideological, theoretical and practical frameworks through which contemporary performance can be understood.

SEMESTER TWO

COM7201B Performance and Ideas (10 credit points)

COM7101B Contemporary Issues in Performing Arts asks four main questions:
What is the contemporary? What is the “now” and how do we theorise the present?
What is the response of the theatre to pressing issues of the day?
What is performance practice’s role in contemporary society?
What are alternative modes of contemporary performing arts?

Equally this subject investigates broader questions:
What is the role of performance practice in social and political questions?
We will look at a range of contemporary debates of the theatre that are pressing to the art form now.
How do we address futures thinking and predictive scenario development for imagined constructs?

Student-led Projects

SEMESTER ONE

COM7203A Student-Led Projects (5 credit points)

Subject Purpose
Student-led Projects is a common subject across all disciplines involving second-year students in which each team shapes an artistic vision for presentation drawing on the individual strengths, knowledge and ability of each member to problem-solve in the development and realization of the collaborative endeavour.

Content
Throughout this learning period students will:
Apply collaborative practices to the development of new and interdisciplinary work
Work empathetically, to a shared vision
Apply discipline expertise to a collective project 
Evaluate and reflect on process and performance

SEMESTER TWO

COM7203B Student-Led Projects (5 credit points)

COM7203A Student-led Projects and COM7203B Student-led Projects derive from the theoretical and methodological frameworks explored in COM7102 Introduction to Collaboration. Student-led Projects is a common subject across all disciplines involving second-year students from every discipline. Students self-select their collaborative teams and are encouraged to achieve cross cohort representation. Together each team shapes an idea for presentation drawing on the individual strengths, knowledge and ability of each member to problem-solve in the development and realization of the collaborative endeavour. Collaborative groups request input from staff or external mentors as or when it is required. Co- ordination of this subject and trouble shooting is provided by the subject coordinator with assistance from a designated point of contact from each discipline within NIDA. In COM7203B Student-led Projects students build on the collaborative practice project established in COM7203A Student-led Projects by bringing the project to realization. Students present their work in this semester and finalise their peer review through group evaluation.

Third year

Costume Studio

SEMESTER ONE

COS7301A COSTUME STUDIO (15 credit points)

The students’ journeys of discovery continue with Costume Studio 3A in which students develop and establish the framework for a substantial, mentored research project. The underlying pedagogical philosophy of Costume Studio 3A is that summative learning is best achieved by cumulative and problem-solving experiences. This project entails a self-initiated interrogation propelled by the individual students. It enables the students to investigate in depth an aspect of costume or clothing about which they wish to test a hypothesis or gain a greater understanding. At this point in the course students use their judgment to evaluate the appropriate skills, methodologies and techniques to progress towards their research outcome. Progress is monitored by the Head of Course and relevant mentors but students meet together throughout the process to interrogate and discuss their discoveries and progress.

SEMESTER TWO

COS7301B COSTUME STUDIO (15 credit points)

COS7301B Costume Studio is the culminating work and presentation for Costume Studies a tNIDA. Costume Studio COS7301B continues the research and experimentation that begins with Costume Studio COS7301A continues until half way through the semester when the research project (a synthesis of research, practice and process) is presented publicly. It can be delivered as a dissertation, presented as a creative work or a combination of both. The documentation of the process forms part of the presentation as does the form and manner of presentation. As students of a storytelling medium, the students must present their research and conclusions in an engaging and informative manner.

Costume Interdisciplinary Collaboration

SEMESTER ONE

COS7302A COSTUME INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (30 credit points)

Students take on the leadership role of costume supervisor for a main-stage production, synthesising accumulated managerial, technical and creative learning. The students engage with other departments in the full production process from initial design consultations through the planning, construction and rehearsal process to technical and dress rehearsals, performances and bump-outs. Oversight of the process includes guidance and supervision of less experienced crew from their own and other courses. At this stage of their learning students bring a high level of autonomous thought and planning to the realisation of costumes for a production. Through a process of distinguishing the efficacy of making, buying or sourcing the costumes, students identify a costume that would present a suitable challenge for them to make. Students co-curate an exhibition or installation within the NIDA environment or extend their collaboration beyond NIDA’s venues and personnel. Students have the opportunity to liaise with external stakeholders to conceptualise, progress and fulfil the brief for the exhibition or installation.

SEMESTER TWO

COS7302B COSTUME INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION (30 credit points)

In COS7302B Costume Interdisciplinary Collaboration students use their insights into the world of costume to identify the direction of their potential career path and decide a direction to pursue within the collaborative process. They may choose to supervise a large-scale production with new and differing challenges and personnel or undertake to construct significant male and female costumes, identifying areas not previously addressed within their collaborative experience.
In Costume Interdisciplinary Collaboration COS7302B students investigate specialist costumes that could include extreme body shaping, non-traditional costume materials or techniques, costume-props and traditional dancewear such as leotards. This project enables students to interface with a diverse portfolio of stakeholders to understand the varying needs of specialist performance.

Costume Professional Practice

SEMESTER ONE

COS7303A COSTUME PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (15 credit points)

This purpose of this subject is twofold: firstly, it instills students with the non-discipline specific skills and knowledge they will require to successfully pursue careers within a professional artistic environment; secondly, it commences the introduction and integration of the students into professional industries, networks and communities.
This purpose is achieved through a combination of formal information sessions and forums, as well as through experiential and immersive learning opportunities within the industry under professional guidance. These approaches coalesce in the inculcating of practical skills and knowledge, whilst also providing students with a broader contextualisation, understanding and experience of the industry.

SEMESTER TWO

COS7303B COSTUME PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (15 credit points)

In COS7303B Costume Professional Practice students continue their integration into professional industries, networks and communities in an environment chosen to expand on their previous experience within the profession.
This semester students complete the non-discipline specific skills and knowledge they will require to successfully pursue careers within a professional artistic environment. The outcome is achieved through a combination of formal information sessions and forums, as well as through an experiential and immersive learning opportunity within the industry under professional guidance. These approaches coalesce in the inculcating of practical skills and knowledge, whilst also providing students with a broader contextualisation, understanding and experience of the industry

Admission criteria

Essential requirements for admission

Admission Criteria

NIDA's general entry requirements for accredited courses are:

  • Have completed a High School Certificate or equivalent qualification at the end of high school for undergraduate courses
    • NIDA will waive the requirement for completion of year 12 studies where an applicant's work and life experience supports their ability and skills to engage in their selected program (includes those who left secondary education more than 2 years ago).
  • Be 18 years of age by 31 March in the first year of enrolment for domestic students in undergraduate programs (only in exceptional circumstances can this condition be waived) and 18 years at date of commencement for international students (there is no waiver for international students on age).
  • Be proficient in written and spoken English. International students must have an English language proficiency equivalent to IELTS 7.0 with no band score less than 6.0 (IELTS 8.0 for BFA (Acting)).
  • Have skills and knowledge appropriate to the level and discipline the applicant is seeking to gain admission into.
  • Have an evidenced interest in the performing arts.

NIDA does not currently have an enabled course or bridging program.

Essential requirements

We select students who:

  • demonstrate commitment, motivation and passion in relation to the arts, entertainment and related industries, to their chosen discipline, and to the course of study
  • provide evidence of their capacity to work creatively and imaginatively
  • demonstrate an aptitude to collaborate with peers as part of a creative process
  • demonstrate a range of knowledge, skills, technical abilities and/or problem-solving techniques relevant to their discipline
  • demonstrate cultural and contextual awareness
  • articulate and communicate ideas clearly

NIDA encourages applications from students from diverse backgrounds, with different levels of experience in theatre, film, television or other areas.

NIDA welcomes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants. General admissions requirements apply.

Due to the volume of auditions carried out, we are unable to provide you with individual feedback. The decision of the audition panel is final.

It is not possible to defer an offer of a place at NIDA.

International students

We require all international applicants to:

  • attend an audition in Australia.
  • be aware of the visa conditions and financial obligations you are required to meet as an overseas student.
  • accept full responsibility for all arrangements concerning entry into, and residence in, Australia (including visas and health insurance).
  • have an English language proficiency equivalent to an overall band score of 7.0 IELTS (8.0 for Acting). Information on IELTS and testing centres in your country is available at www.ielts.org This requirement may be waived for applicants that have completed their high school studies in English.

For more information on applying as an international student, see international students.

Domestic applicants with overseas qualifications

Domestic students with overseas qualifications must supply certified translations of their qualifications.

NIDA's general entry requirements apply and selection is based on merit.

Fees

Tuition fees

Domestic and international students are required to pay tuition fees by the due date each semester.

The tuition fees are reviewed each year and if you enrol you are liable for the additional tuition costs if the tuition fees rise during the course of your enrolments.

Domestic Students

Domestic students are Australian citizens, Australian permanent residents and New Zealand citizens.

Download the NIDA Domestic Undergraduate Student Fees Schedule 2020 (PDF 1.5MB).

Current students can also find 2019 fees in the NIDA Domestic Undergraduate Student Fees Schedule 2019 (PDF 1.2MB).

International Students

Fees and financial assistance vary for international students see International Students for full details.

Domestic tuition fees overview

DegreeCourse duration2020 Annual tuition fee $AUD*Estimated total course tuition fee*
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Costume)Three years$14,640.00$43,920.00

Domestic tuition fee details

Year 1, 2020
Subject codeSubjectCredit pointsEFTSL**Tuition fee*
Semester 1, 2020    
COS7101ACostume Studio300.25$3,660.00
COS7102ACostume Interdisciplinary Collaboration150.125$1,830.00
COM7101APerformance and Ideas100.083$1,220.00
COM7102AIntroduction to Collaboration50.042$610.00
Total for Semester 1, 2020 600.5$7,320.00
Semester 2, 2020    
COS7101BCostume Studio300.25$3,660.00
COS7102BCostume Interdisciplinary Collaboration150.125$1,830.00
COM7101BPerformance and Ideas100.083$1,220.00
COM7102BIntroduction to Collaboration50.042$610.00
Total for Semester 2, 2029 600.5$7,320.00
Total for Year 1 1201$14,640.00
Year 2, 2020
Subject codeSubjectCredit pointsEFTSL**Tuition fee*
Semester 1, 2020    
COS7101ACostume Studio300.25$3,660.00
COS7102ACostume Interdisciplinary Collaboration150.125$1,830.00
COM7101APerformance and Ideas100.083$1,220.00
COM7102AStudent-led Projects50.042$610.00
Total for Semester 1, 2020 600.5$7,320.00
Semester 2, 2020    
COS7101BCostume Studio300.25$3,660.00
COS7102BCostume Interdisciplinary Collaboration150.125$1,830.00
COM7101BPerformance and Ideas100.083$1,220.00
COM7102BStudent-led Projects50.042$610.00
Total for Semester 2, 2020 600.5$7,320.00
Total for Year 2 1201$14,640.00
Year 3, 2019
Subject codeSubjectCredit pointsEFTSL**Tuition fee*
Semester 1, 2020    
COS7101ACostume Studio150.125$1,830.00
COS7102ACostume Interdisciplinary Collaboration300.25$3,660.00
COM7101ACostume Professional Practice150.125$1,830.00
Total for Semester 1, 2020 600.5$7,320.00
Semester 2, 2020    
COS7101BCostume Studio150.25$1,830.00
COS7102BCostume Interdisciplinary Collaboration300.125$3,660.00
COM7101BCostume Professional Practice150.083$1,830.00
Total for Semester 2, 2020 600.5$7,320.00
Total for Year 3 1201$14,640.00

*The tuition fees are reviewed each year and you are liable for the additional tuition costs if the tuition fees rise during the course of your enrolment.

** EFTSL - Effective Fulltime Study Load: indicates the relative study load of a subject against a full time study load of 1.0 for an academic year.

Administration fees

Administration and Other Fees 2019/2020

These fees are payable at the time the service is provided or item purchased.

Item/ServiceDetail2019/2020 Cost
Binding supplies1 comb,1 cover, 1 back$2
GraduationAcademic Dress Hire (gown, hood, cap), and two guests$35
Tickets for additional guests$20 per person
Student ID Card replacementReplacement of a lost student card$25
PhotocopyingB/W – single sided$0.05
B/W – double sided$0.10
Colour – single sided$0.10
Colour – double sided$0.20
Locker keyDeposit$25
Replacement of lost locker key$25
Testamur replacement1 testamur – domestic postage$80
1 testamur – standard international postage$90
Transcript replacement1 transcript – domestic postage$20
1 transcript – standard international postage$30

Additional costs

Equipment List

All these items are to be purchased and labelled with your name prior to arrival at NIDA - an engraving tool is available at NIDA if needed.

This equipment will be checked by your Head of Department by 7 February 2020. You should consider your purchases as life-long investments. All tools on this list will be discussed in the first week of study, such that any queries can be addressed at that time.

Required Tools

  • 1 pair of dressmaking shears (good quality ‘Mundial’ or equivalent). Engrave your name on these.
  • 1 pair of pinking shears
  • 1 pair of craft scissors (for cutting paper, cardboard and other non-fabric materials)
  • 2 pairs rubber gloves (one domestic pair and one industrial, heavy-duty pair for dying)
  • 1 respirator with solvent filters
  • 1 pair of long nose pliers (combination insulated, that can also cut wire)
  • 1 unpicker
  • 1 pack of tailors’ wax (beeswax)
  • 1 lint brush
  • 1 tape measure (inches and centimetres)
  • 1 plastic pattern-making ruler (centimetre square rule)
  • 1 grading ruler (inches and centimetres). Can be obtained from quilters’ stores.
  • 1 pattern-making French curve
  • 1 thimble
  • 2 tracing wheels (sharp and blunt)
  • 1 packet carbon tracing paper (Burda assorted colours)
  • 1 packet tailors’ chalk in various colours
  • 1 large box of pearl-headed pins
  • 1 stiletto (for making holes)
  • 1 packet hand-sewing needles
  • 1 thread snips
  • 3 fine permanent markers (red, black, blue) – ‘Sharpies’ are good
  • Airbrush (Delta 81010 or similar)

Most of these items can be bought from Greenfields (02 9212 1944, 30-36 Ann Street, Surry Hills).

Optional Tools

  • 1 camera or camera phone for taking photographs of classes, fittings and to start recording work for your portfolio
  • 1 pattern notcher (can be bought from ‘Henmark’ in Alexandria)
  • 1 metre ruler (centimetres)
  • 1 plastic sewing or fishing tackle box
  • Laptop

Stationery Requirements

  • 1 address book with refill options or a digital version
  • 1 A4 lined spiral notebook
  • A supply of HB, B and 2B pencils, a pencil sharpener and a soft eraser
  • Writing pens
  • 1 strong stapler
  • 1 paper hole-punch
  • Invisible or ‘magic’ sticky tape and office style tape dispenser
  • 1 A3 ring folder
  • 3-4 A4 ring folders
  • 1 box (100) A4 and A3 plastic sleeves

During the term, additional stationary may be required at your expense. NIDA only supplies stationery for productions.

Clothing Requirements

Shortly after arriving at NIDA you will be required to have a set of black clothes for production work (a long sleeved black top and long black trousers). You should also have protective footwear to be worn in the workrooms and theatre spaces. For Costume students this means enclosed, comfortable shoes.

Safe working clothing is COMPULSORY when in the workshop area.

Closed shoes must be worn at all times in the workshop studios and theatres.

Recommended Reading

While students are provided with the script of any plays they are involved in as part of the NIDA Production Program, students are encouraged to purchase other scripts and textbooks for subjects such as Performance and Ideas.

Information Technology Recommendations

To access NIDA wireless (iWIRE) network, students are required to have access to a Laptop (Windows 7 and later), Macbook (Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard or later) or a Tablet (less than three years old with wireless facility). All the devices should comply with 802.11a/b/g/n WPA-Enterprise security. All notebooks should be secured with a Kensington lock to help prevent theft.

For file transfers and data backup, a 500GB hard drive or higher and an 8GB USB stick are also recommended, as is a DVD burner, for optimum visual graphics on your computer(Laptop/MacBook/Desktop etc.) a 1GB dedicated graphics card is recommended but not required.

Further financial information

Australian citizens and holders of permanent humanitarian visas are eligible for an Australian Government FEE-HELP loan for all or part of their tuition fees. For more information about FEE-HELP please read the information below and visit Study Assist.

FEE-HELP

WHAT IS FEE-HELP?

FEE-HELP is the Australian Government loan scheme that assists eligible students to pay their tuition fees, so that students do not have to pay tuition fees up-front. FEE-HELP can cover all or part of a student's tuition fees. In 2019, the FEE-HELP limit is $104,440 for most students.

A loan fee of 25% applies to FEE-HELP loans for undergraduate courses of study. The FEE-HELP limit does not include the loan fee.

The Government pays the amount of the loan directly to NIDA. Students repay their loan through the tax system once their income rises above the minimum threshold for compulsory repayment.

For more information go to www.studyassist.gov.au

WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR FEE-HELP?

You are eligible for a FEE-HELP loan if you are either:

  • an Australian Citizen; or
  • hold a permanent humanitarian visa.

The following students are NOT eligible for FEE-HELP:

  • New Zealand citizens - refer to the Study Assist website
  • Australian permanent residents
  • Overseas students.

Financial assistance

Eligible students, who are Australian residents, can apply to Centrelink for financial assistance through Youth Allowance, Austudy or ABSTUDY. Visit Centrelink or call 132 490 for more information.

While at NIDA, students can also apply for consideration for a NIDA student bursary. Each year there are a limited number of NIDA student bursaries to assist with living costs. These are allocated to students on the basis of financial need with second and third year undergraduates and Master of Fine Arts students prioritised. The bursaries are made available through the generosity of donors to NIDA and from bequests.

Statement of Tuition Assurance Exemption

Under the Higher Education Support Act 2003, (the HESA) and the Higher Education Provider Guidelines, approved Higher Education Providers must have arrangements in place to protect students if the Provider is unable to continue to offer a course for any reason, unless the Provider has been exempted from this requirement.

As required under 2.5.1.5 of the Higher Education Provider Guidelines of 23 November 2006, NIDA advises that, under section 16-30 (2) of the HESA, NIDA has been granted an exemption from the tuition assurance requirements of HESA. The reason for the exemption is that NIDA is in receipt of funding from the Australian Government. As NIDA is principally funded by the Australian Government, appropriate transition arrangements would be put in place should it be decided to discontinue a course.

FAQs

Entry requirements FAQs

What ATAR score do I need to get into NIDA?

Entry into NIDA courses is by audition or interview only. We do not ask for exam scores or ATAR rankings. However, all applicants applying for any higher education course at NIDA must have completed their Higher School Certificate or equivalent qualification at the end of high school. In exceptional circumstances this requirement can be waived. 

What subjects should I study at school?

NIDA does not require students to have studied any particular subjects at school. However, it is beneficial during their period of study at NIDA for students to have a high level of literacy and to have read widely. A strong working knowledge of subjects such as English and History is helpful to provide an understanding of historical context and literary references in theatre and literature. It is helpful to have an understanding of drama and, if possible, to have attended a range of theatre and films. Applicants for some courses often study Design and Technology, Textiles and Design, or similar subjects such as Art. Knowledge of a language other than English and understanding of other cultures is also beneficial. 

For courses such as Properties and Objects, Staging, Design for Performance, and Technical Theatre and Stage Management there is a need to have some numeracy and basic computing skills. For the Staging and Properties and Objects courses there is a need to be comfortable with basic applied algebra, geometry and physical concepts but memorisation is not required and use of these concepts is very practically focused. 

Is there a minimum age restriction?

The minimum age for entry into NIDA’s full-time courses is 18 years. Students are expected to be at least 18 years of age at the commencement of their first year, or within a few months of commencement. In exceptional circumstances this condition may be waived. Applicants must be at least 17 years of age at the time of their audition or interview.

Applications from those 16 years and younger will not be accepted.

Is there a maximum age restriction?

There is no maximum age restriction. As a guide to the age distribution at NIDA, the ages of students in undergraduate courses at the start of 2016 ranged from 17 years to early 30s, with the average age being 21.

The average age in the Master of Fine Arts courses is 32, with an age range from early 20s to mid-40s.

Application FAQs

How do I apply for a full-time course at NIDA?

Application to NIDA is by direct entry. Applicants apply online via the NIDA website.

NIDA will accept applications for the 2020 intake from 1 July - 30 September, 2019.

You must then prepare for your audition or interview, the details of which can be found on the course pages.

My application form isn’t working/loading!

If you are having difficulty using the online application form, check your internet browser: Chrome, Firefox and Safari are the recommended browsers. You should also turn off any security that blocks pop-ups, as this may prevent the application screen from opening. While application form will still work on a tablet or mobile device, it performs best on a PC or laptop.

Can I apply for more than one course?

Yes, however a separate online application form and payment of application fee AUD$75.00 will be required for each course you would like to apply for.

What do I do if the audition/ interview dates are not suitable?

NIDA aims to accommodate all Australian states during the audition/ interview period.

If the dates provided are not suitable to individuals applying to non-Acting courses we will try to work with you to create a mutually agreeable alternative. If you cannot attend any of the available dates, please select ‘Other Interstate’ when completing the application form and email applications@nida.edu.au to discuss further options.

Unfortunately due to the large volume of applications to the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Acting) course, we cannot schedule any alternative dates other than those advertised.

Audition and interview FAQs

What do I need to prepare for my audition/interview?

All the details for audition and interview requirements can be found on the individual course pages under the ‘How to Apply’ tab.

Does NIDA give audition/interview feedback?

Due to the large number of people being auditioned or interviewed, it is not possible for NIDA to provide individual feedback, either orally or in writing. However, the auditions and interviews are learning experiences, particularly through the opportunity in the auditions to observe the presentation of audition pieces by other applicants and any redirection suggestions provided to you or other applicants by members of the audition panel. 

What are my chances of getting into NIDA’s Acting course straight from high school?

There are around 1700 applicants for the 24 places in the Acting course. Most school leavers who apply for the Acting course are not accepted the first time they apply. There are advantages to having some life experience and maturity to be able to cope with a very rigorous course. However, the audition process is a valuable one and provides useful experience for future applications. There were two school-leavers among the 24 applicants selected for entry in 2016.

Where will my interview take place?

During your online application you will have the opportunity to select the date and location of your audition/ interview. The specific location details will be included in your receipt once you have submitted a complete application form. Please note that NIDA reserves the right to amend your audition/ interview date/ location at any time depending on scheduling requirements.

What happens after my interview?

Final selections are made for each course by mid- December when study offers will be distributed to successful applicants via email.

Please note applicants who do not make it through to the recall stage for Bachelor of Fine Arts (Acting) and Master of Fine Arts (Directing) courses have not been successful for the 2019 intake.

Studying at NIDA FAQs

What are the contact hours for BFA courses?

Students are at NIDA from 9am to 6pm from Monday to Friday. During production terms students may also be required for rehearsals after hours and on weekends.

Additional time also needs to be allocated to library work, research, preparation for classes and private study. For this reason it is difficult for NIDA students to maintain regular part-time jobs. Studying at NIDA is a big commitment so students need to manage their time and resources carefully.

How are NIDA’s courses structured?

NIDA offers a conservatoire based method of education and training based around intensive practice-based learning.

There is formal class work, practical instruction, lectures and, for some courses, periods of placements in the arts industry. Each course has dedicated time to discipline-specific immersion, as well as common subjects undertaken by students of all disciplines.

NIDA Play Productions and screen work provides practical learning experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply learnt technical skills. Play productions are an important part of NIDA’s higher education courses with usually five productions being produced each semester.

More detailed information about course structure can be found on the individual course pages. 

What facilities does NIDA offer?

NIDA’s award winning campus includes a range of facilities available to students:

  • the Parade Theatre, seating over 700 people, is equipped with advanced technology in sound, lighting and scenery
  • performance spaces of varying sizes. The Parade Studio, Parade Playhouse, Parade Space and Atrium are also utilised for productions
  • the state-of-the-art Reg Grundy Studio is used for film and television recording
  • the Rodney Seaborn Library, specialising in the performing arts
  • computer-aided design (CAD) and multimedia studios
  • rehearsal rooms, teaching spaces and music practice rooms
  • and workshops for the manufacture of scenery, properties and costumes.

What student services does NIDA offer?

Because of NIDA’s close relationship with UNSW, in addition to the NIDA library, NIDA students have access to the UNSW Library, The Learning Centre, health services and the UNSW Fitness and Aquatic Centre, all located close to NIDA.

NIDA students have access to student counselling services provided through UNSW.

Indigenous students can also use the services of the Nura Gili Indigenous Programs Centre at UNSW.

Does NIDA offer credit transfer for study undertaken elsewhere?

Yes, NIDA grants credit for formal study undertaken in recognised higher institutions in Australia, including universities, colleges, TAFE and other post-secondary education institutions and for study at recognised overseas institutions, where the applicant has met the learning outcomes, attained the knowledge and/or developed the skills relevant to a specific subject. An application for credit must be submitted and approved prior to commencement of the course. For further information see NIDA’s credit transfer policy.

Accommodation FAQs

NIDA does not provide accommodation for students. However the following information will help you consider some options available to you.

UNSW on-campus housing

Although NIDA is not part of the University of New South Wales (UNSW), NIDA students can access the student accommodation at UNSW.

UNSW is located directly across from NIDA on Anzac Parade, Kensington and has a number of on-campus residential colleges and self-catered apartments that Study Abroad students can apply for by going directly to their websites:

Fully catered colleges:

Self-catered apartments:

Seeking rental accommodation independently

Rental accommodation in the immediate vicinity of NIDA is not usually easy to find at short notice, can be expensive and Sydney landlords usually require a minimum six month lease to be signed. It is also in high demand so it is advisable to start searching at least two or three weeks before you start the course. You should also consider that not all accommodation is furnished and you may need to buy furniture.

Students tend to look for accommodation in suburbs near NIDA such as Randwick, Kensington, Kingsford, Coogee and Maroubra or, slightly further away, in Newtown, Surry Hills or Paddington, because of proximity and transport services. Students at NIDA often have to stay late during production and projects times so it is important that transport is available. Some useful websites that list rental agents and/or rental accommodation are:

Seeking share housing

Many students at NIDA find share accommodation in houses and apartments in the surrounding areas. The advantage to share renting is that all costs, rent, electricity, gas etc are shared, reducing the overall cost of living. Share rentals are often advertised on the rental websites given above, but NIDA students also post notices to the student web pages when they are seeking someone to share their accommodation. Students will be able to access these pages as soon as they have accepted their offer of place at NIDA.

Alternatively, there are local, public forums for seeking share-housing independently such as flatmates.com.au and closed Facebook groups such as Eastern Suburbs Housemates and Inner West Housemates (read the guidelines listed and request to join).

For any queries regarding the NIDA Study Abroad program contact us at applications@nida.edu.au.

NIDA Student policies FAQs

Can I defer my studies at NIDA?

Due to the highly competitive nature of NIDA’s admissions process, you must enrol for the year for which you have been offered a place. You cannot defer acceptance of a place. If you want to enrol in a subsequent year, you will need to apply again the following year and go through the audition/interview process again. There is no guarantee that you will be offered a place next time.

A first year student who discontinues a course of study during the year and wishes to return the following year, must re-apply for admission to NIDA in the normal manner. There is no guarantee of re-admission.

Application for leave of absence by continuing students must be made in writing with reasons to the Head of Course for consideration and recommendation to the Director. Approval for leave of absence can only be granted by the Director/CEO. It should be noted that approval for leave of absence will only be granted under exceptional circumstances.

Can students be suspended from NIDA?

In addition to cancellation of enrolment for non-payment of tuition fees, a student’s enrolment at NIDA can be suspended or cancelled on the grounds of misconduct. Refer to the Student Misconduct Procedures below.

Where can I find more information about NIDA Student Policies?

See NIDA Student Policies for more information. 

Fees FAQs

What are the tuition fees for accredited courses?

Full information about tuition fees and FEE-HELP is available under the ‘Fees’ tab on individual course pages. 

Are there any other costs to study at NIDA apart from tuition fees?

There is an optional annual fee of $40 to join the Student Council of NIDA (SCON).While students are provided with the script of any plays they are involved in as part of the NIDA Production Program, students are encouraged to purchase other scripts and textbooks for subjects such as Performance and Ideas.

Acting students must wear “blacks” to class everyday i.e. leotards, jogging pants, sweat pants, simple black tops or T-shirts, so students need to make sure they have at least a couple of sets of blacks to get themselves through the week. Acting students must also supply their own make-up and soft black shoes.

Scenic Construction and Technologies, Design for Performance, Costume, Properties and Objects, Technical Theatre and Stage Management students are required to purchase specific tools and equipment, which should be considered as lifelong investments. Students using workshop spaces are also required to have closed-toe protective footwear. Technical Theatre and Stage Management students should also have a few sets of “blacks” for working on productions.

Design for Performance students are also expected to purchase their own art equipment, drawing paper, cardboard and other material for models and should allow around $1000 for this each year.

To access NIDA wireless (iWIRE) network, students are required to have access to a Laptop (Windows 7 and later), Macbook (Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard or later) or a Tablet (less than three years old with wireless facility). All the devices should comply with 802.11a/b/g/n WPA-Enterprise security.

For file transfers and data backup, a 500GB hard drive or higher and an 8GB USB stick are also recommended, as is a DVD burner, for optimum visual graphics on your computer(Laptop/MacBook/Desktop etc..) a 1GB dedicated graphics card is recommended but not compulsory.

For a full list of additional costs by course please refer to the NIDA Domestic Undergraduate Student Fees Schedule 2019 (PDF 1115KB).

Financial assistance FAQs

Are there scholarships available for studying at NIDA?

NIDA does not offer scholarships that cover the cost of tuition fees. NIDA students, who are Australian citizens, are able to access FEE-HELP loans for assistance with their tuition fees. For more information on FEE-HELP loans see www.studyassist.gov.au.

NIDA offers students the opportunity to apply for financial assistance (bursaries) at the beginning of each year to assist with living costs. The bursaries are made available through the generosity of donors to NIDA and from bequests. Bursaries are paid on a fortnightly basis during the NIDA year, with the value of individual bursaries in 2014 ranging from $1500 annually to $4000 annually, depending on need and the year and course of study. These funds are allocated to students on the basis of financial need, course of study and year of study. Bursaries are only available to students currently enrolled at NIDA.

What other financial assistance is available to undergraduate students?

Eligible students enrolled in NIDA’s undergraduate courses can apply to Centrelink for Austudy, Youth Allowance and ABSTUDY. Visit Centrelink or call 132 490 for more information. 

Is financial assistance available for students in the Master of Fine Arts?

The Master of Fine Arts courses are not approved courses for students to receive Austudy, Youth Allowance (student) and Pensioner Education Supplement through Centrelink. Master of Fine Arts students are eligible to apply for a NIDA bursary

NZ and international students FAQs

Is there a limit on the number of international students accepted each year?

NIDA welcomes applications from international students. While there is no quota for international students, there are limited numbers of students in each course.

What are the English language requirements for international students?

Students must be proficient in written and spoken English, with international applicants required to have an English language proficiency equivalent to an overall band score of IELTS 8.0 for Acting, Directing and Writing for Performance, or IELTS 7.0 for other higher education courses. Information on IELTS and testing centres in your country is available at www.ielts.org.

International applicants who are short-listed for the Acting course after the recall audition must provide evidence of their English language capability by the end of the first week in December in order to be considered in the final selection process. International applications for other courses should bring evidence of their English language capability to their interview.

Where can I find more information about international students at NIDA?

More information about studying as an international student at NIDA can be found at International students

How to apply

Application Process

Application to NIDA is by direct entry. Applicants apply online via the NIDA website.

Entry to the BFA Costume is by interview. Applicants will need to prepare a project prior to their interview - see below for details or download the BFA Application Guide for 2020.

How to apply

There are six steps to successfully applying for a NIDA course:

STEP 1

Create your application account (link to be provided from 1 July).

You will then be sent an automatic email with your log in details to continue your application.

STEP 2

Log in, select the green ‘New Application’ button and complete the online form.

STEP 3

Upload the following documentation to the online form:

  • Evidence of your most recent qualification (e.g. school report, Higher School Certificate, university transcript or testamur).
  • Proof of identification (e.g. passport, driver’s licence, birth certificate; ID must show your date of birth).
  • A passport style photograph (less than six months old, in colour, well lit, plain background).
  • Academic IELTS or equivalent (international applicants only)
  • Any course related documents/portfolios.

STEP 4

Make payment of the AUD$75 administration fee by credit/debit card.

STEP 5

Book your audition or interview date in your nearest capital city.

STEP 6

Attend your audition or interview, having prepared the relevant material for your course.

Interview dates

Below are the expected interview dates for 2019. Please note: NIDA reserves the right to amend and otherwise alter interview dates and locations, subject to minimum applicant numbers per region.

Sydney

11 November
18 November
22 November

Adelaide

12 November

Melbourne

13 November

Brisbane

20 November

For all other locations select ‘Other Interstate' when completing the application form and email applications@nida.edu.au to discuss your options.

Your Interview

What to prepare

SUBMIT WITH YOUR APPLICATION

The following may be uploaded with your application:

1. PORTFOLIO

  • Your portfolio may include photographic or video examples of your art/craft/sewing and costume-related work; documentation of the development process of some items; and documentation of the inside of finished garments. You may upload a digital portfolio with your application; otherwise you can bring one with you to your interview. If you upload a digital version, please also bring along a display or printed copy to your interview.
PREPARE FOR YOUR INTERVIEW

The following should be prepared in advance to be discussed at your interview:

2. GARMENT PROJECT

  • Select a garment pattern from the provided list for your project. Prepare your project according to the requirements and bring it along to your interview for discussion.

What to expect on the day

You should be prepared to spend half the day at your interview (i.e. either the morning or the afternoon).

The interview is in four parts:

  • First, there will be a brief talk about NIDA, the Costume course and what will happen during the individual interview. There will be an opportunity for you to ask any questions you may have about NIDA or about the interview itself.
  • Each applicant will then be interviewed for around 30 minutes. During the interview, we will discuss your garment project, your portfolio and costume related work. We will discuss these with you to learn more about your background, abilities, interests, aspirations, and why you wish to study Costume at NIDA.
  • You will also undertake a short sewing test following a set of instructions. NIDA will provide all the equipment you will need for this.
  • You will be asked to write a short response to an image or costume provided at the time.

Interview tips

  • Preparation! The more time and effort you put into the projects and interview preparation in advance, the more confident you’ll be and the more you will benefit from the interview and discussion.
  • Come with a clear idea of why you want to study Costume at NIDA.
  • Plan your journey to the interview. Give yourself plenty of travel time to allow for delays.
  • We know that interviews can be stressful, but every effort will be made to ensure your experience will be as interesting and enjoyable as possible. The interview is designed to give you the very best opportunity to show your potential and readiness to study at NIDA.

Garment Project Information

Garment project options

Make a garment for yourself, a friend or family member using one of the following commercial patterns:

  • Simplicity 1039 Men’s Cosplay Costumes (jacket only)

lincraft.com.au/simplicity-pattern-1039-mens-cosplay-costumes (purchase online)

  • Simplicity 1253 Misses Top (with sleeves)

https://www.lincraft.com.au/simplicity-pattern-1253-misses-top-with-length-variations (purchase online)

  • Burda ¾ Sleeve Blouse 02/2018

https://www.burdastyle.com/pattern_store/patterns/34-sleeve-blouse-022018 ((purchase online)

  • Burda Rustic Worker’s Shirt 12/2012

https://www.burdastyle.com/pattern_store/patterns/rustic-workers-shirt-122012 (purchase online)

Please contact NIDA if you are having difficulty obtaining a pattern.

Garment project requirements

  • Make a garment for yourself, a friend or family member using one of the patterns listed.
  • Make the pattern as it exists - please do not alter the basic pattern unless it is for the purpose of a better fit. You may use any fabric or combination of fabrics, decoration and finish that you wish.
  • Please do not spend a great deal of money on your materials – we will be looking at your creativity and technical skills rather than the value of the materials themselves. Interpret the design in any way that you wish within the limits of the given shape.
  • Photograph the garment being worn by the person for whom it was made; styling is encouraged.
  • Bring the garment to your interview well pressed, in a garment bag or plastic covering and on a coat hanger with your name attached. Only send the garment in advance if you are having a video interview, with the photos included.
  • The garment project is an important point of discussion at your interview. NIDA is, of course, particularly interested in viewing the finished quality of what you present, but remember, skills can be developed by practice and guidance and NIDA will provide these if your application is successful.
  • Bring your entire project along to the interview – do not send it in advance.

Advanced standing

The collaborative nature of NIDA's conservatoire training means that NIDA does not encourage advanced standing/academic credit/recognition of prior learning, particularly for discipline based subjects. However a student can apply for academic credit or recognition of prior learning at the time of enrolment. Details are available on the student policies page.

See definitions for common terminology (PDF, 33KB).

Student profile

The table below gives an indication of the educational backgrounds of the 2019 commencing undergraduate BFA peer cohort in all disciplines at NIDA.
It should be noted that as selection and admission to courses at NIDA is based on merit the statistics below may not be indicative of the educational backgrounds of commencing cohorts on a year to year basis.

Applicant BackgroundNumber of studentsPercentage of all students
(A) Past higher education study7 11.1%
(B) Past Vocational Education and Training study2539.7%
(C) Recent secondary education
Admitted on basis of other criteria and ATAR was not a factor
2438.1%
(D) Work and life experience5 7.9%
International students2 3.2%
All students63 100%

L/N - Low numbers: the number of students is less than 5.
N/P - Not published: the number is hidden to prevent calculation of numbers in cells with less than 5 students.

What does it take to put on a show?

Take a peek behind the curtain to see how our students collaborate each year on our June and October Student Production seasons.

Student work

See some of our students' work from productions, events, rehearsals, classwork and student projects.

Careers

As a graduate of the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Costume) you will have the necessary skills and knowledge required to succeed across the multidisciplinary field of costume making. Our graduates have been employed by Opera Australia, The Australian Ballet, Sydney Theatre Company, Cosprop (London), Bangarra and on movies such as The Dressmaker, Peter Rabbit, Aquaman and more.

Potential careers

  • Costume supervisor
  • Costume maker
  • Costume cutter
  • Costume assistant or standby
  • Theatrical tailor
  • Buyer
  • Stylist
  • Finisher
  • Milliner
  • Wardrobe manager

See NIDA's list of Alumni.

Further Info

For more info, check the course guide (PDF, 2.5MB)

If you have any further questions about the application process, please contact:

Email: applications@nida.edu.au

Phone: +61 (02) 9697 7614
+61 (02) 9697 7611
+61 (02) 9697 7654

Mail:

Applications
NIDA
215 Anzac Parade
Kensington NSW 2033

Further information:

NIDA Undergraduate and Graduate policies and procedures
Commonwealth Register
National Register of Higher Education Providers

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